By Rodney Hays

Editor

Two Prosper girls worked hard recently trying to help an area women’s shelter.

Brooke Meyering, a Cockrell Elementary fourth grader, and Trinity Funk, a fourth grader at Grace Academy in Prosper, each spearheaded projects to help Hope’s Door, the only domestic violence shelter in Collin County.

Meyering spent time typing up letters asking donors to purchase her handmade rainbow loom bracelets the help the women and children of the shelter. Funk made pillows for the shelter.

Trinity’s mom, Stephanie Funk, took both girls to Hope’s Door’s headquarters for the girls to be greeted by the staff and allow the girls to share their donations. Funk is the board president of Hope’s Door.

Funk said she met Brooke’s parents, Kala and Chris Meyering, at the shelter’s gala in November. That’s where Funk first heard about Brooke’s cause.

"Trinity, my daughter helped me decorate the shelter in October and I decided to ask her teacher about doing the pillows for a project," Funk said. "I bought the pillows and materials and took it up to the school."

Funk said her daughter has been exposed to the shelter for most of her life. "I have served on the board and a former Garland Police officer so Trinity has heard a lot about our world violence," she said.

The projects were the first for both girls. The girls became friends attending Sky Ranch over the summer but did their projects independently.

Hope’s Door has an emergency shelter that sleeps up to 21 woman and children. Funk said the shelter offers counseling services for both the victims and batterers. Transitional housing is another service many victims need and Hope’s Door provides. Hope’s Door resale store provides wardrobes for the victims as many leave in the middle of the night with only the clothes on their backs. The shelter’s website is www.hopesdoorinc.org.

"In 2013, Hope’s Door sheltered 426 women and children — our highest in years. We had to refer out 337 crisis calls due to our shelter being at capacity. We are looking to grow and expand to help these needs in 2014," said Stephanie Funk.